The People’s Convention: Why It’s Important to Join Organizations.

I’ve had over a week now to digest the many great lessons learned at the Center for Popular Democracy’s (CPD) Our Vision, Our Future: People’s Convention held in Detroit, MI from July 25-27th.  In the time since coming home, and post watching the Democratic primary debates that also took place in Detroit shortly after the convention, I’ve had some time to reflect on the significance of this convention both personally and politically. Personally, I feel like I’ve found my tribe. It was such an empowering opportunity to bring so much of what I personally identify with and give it a … Continue reading The People’s Convention: Why It’s Important to Join Organizations.

Part two – Creating Culture: Choosing to Be An Emotionally Present Parent

Click Here to read Part One Admittedly, the past few years since becoming a parent have been very stressful. From not knowing why both my children did not meet key developmental milestones (and the initial helplessness and hopelessness that came with that) to not know how to help them.  Because I trust in the guidance of my chi, my question never rests at “Why me?” and quickly moves to “Who else is going through this?” And to my surprise, there are so many families struggling in isolation in what can be a daunting journey to coming to terms with a … Continue reading Part two – Creating Culture: Choosing to Be An Emotionally Present Parent

Part One – Creating Culture: Choosing to Be An Emotionally Present Parent

Last week, I had the pleasure of participating in the 2017 Transformational Leadership Forum hosted by the Georgetown University National Center for Cultural Competency (NCCC). I was not only honored to have had the opportunity to learn from highly skilled cultural competency trainers, but the icing on the cake has been to now be invited to participate in DC team’s Community of Practice on Cultural and Linguistic Competence in Developmental Disabilities (CoP), led by partners in the DC Department on Disability Services and involves other collaborators within DC government and in non-governmental agencies.  There was so much useful content presented … Continue reading Part One – Creating Culture: Choosing to Be An Emotionally Present Parent

Caretaker in Maleness: The Economy of Male Teachers and Healthcare Professionals

Last week, I was invited to speak with the Male Caregivers  Advocacy Support Group, an initiative of Health Services for Children with Special Needs (HSCSN).  It was truly an honor and pleasure to be surrounded with black men that are committed to being strong support for their loved ones with disabilities.  It brought tears to my eyes because, personally, I struggle with providing male support for my boys. And while I harbor some guilt due to the breakdown of my union with their father and, at the same time, am frustrated with the fact that he lives out-of-state; I am solution-oriented … Continue reading Caretaker in Maleness: The Economy of Male Teachers and Healthcare Professionals

ESSA and Special Education: the Spectrum of Hopes and Fears of a Parent Advocate

 We are only half-way through 2017 and already, this year has proven to be groundbreaking in regards to Local and Federal policies regarding delivery of care education services for students with disabilities.  From the landmarks Supreme Court ruling in the March 2017 Endrews F. v Douglass County School District, which ruled in favor of academically challenging individual education plans (IEP) in the least restrictive environment (LRE) as mandated by the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) revised in 2004, to the June 2017 District Court of Appeals ruling in the D.L. v District of Columbia that upholds a 2011 ruling in favor … Continue reading ESSA and Special Education: the Spectrum of Hopes and Fears of a Parent Advocate

What Happens Next in DC Child Find Policies is Up to Parents and Allies of Children with Disabilities

After a weekend of much needed rest and reflection, I have had some time to think not just about what independence means to me but what it means for my children. Frederick Douglass was not only a hero in the anti-slavery movement, he was also prolific in articulating great ideas expressed in speeches such as “The Meaning of the Fourth of July to the Negro“. As we sit waiting for the Republican led-Senate to make its next move in regards to the country’s health care policies that have a major consequences on individuals with disabilities in all walks of live, … Continue reading What Happens Next in DC Child Find Policies is Up to Parents and Allies of Children with Disabilities

Medicaid and Me

It is wonderful news to hear that the vote on the massive tax-cut for the wealthy bill (disguised as a health care bill) has been postponed for at least another week and a half. Yet as a mother and head of household of two young children with autism whose quality of care is heavily dependent on what happens to health care policy, I remain sober. Because we live in a world where it is sometimes hard to tell fact from fiction, here are some personal and objective truths as to why it is important to remain vigilant and engaged in … Continue reading Medicaid and Me

Part 2: What is Basic Income

In the last post on Basic Income, I alluded to the pilot program that was just approved in Hawaii as well as the project in Ontario, Canada sponsored by the Poverty Reduction Strategy Office (PRSO). I had the pleasure of meeting Karen Glass, the Assistant Deputy Minister of the Ontario PRSO, who is a willing ally to give us tips and support in bringing Basic Income to Washington, DC. But first, before going too far with possibilities, I want to answer a fundamental question: what is basic income and more specifically, what is “universal basic income” (the brand of basic … Continue reading Part 2: What is Basic Income

Part 1: (IDEA/Child Find)+ Basic Income = Equity

This past weekend, I had the opportunity to present at the Sixteenth (16th) Annual North American Basic Income Guarantee Congress at the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College. It was such a positive and uplifting event with a variety of people of many political persuasions and representing different industries that all came together to talk strategy on how to make Basic Income a reality in the United State. Continue reading Part 1: (IDEA/Child Find)+ Basic Income = Equity